Tuesday, October 06, 2015

Menti Sati, or Shepherd

Menti Sati, or Shepherd

Medal of Vespasian, Commemorating the Capture of Jerusalem

Medal of Vespasian, Commemorating the Capture of Jerusalem



  ja•ca•na \jə-ˈkä-nə, ˌzha-sə-ˈnan\ noun
[Portuguese jaçanã, from Tupi jasanã́] circa 1753: any of a family (Jacanidae) of long-legged and long-toed tropical wading birds that frequent coastal freshwater marshes and ponds

Mish, Frederick C. “Preface.” Merriam-Webster’s collegiate dictionary. 2003 : n. pag. Print.

The Ten Plagues of Egypt

The Ten Plagues of Egypt

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

October 6

  When they saw the star they rejoiced with exceeding great joy
        Matt. 2:10

We who look for Jesus ought to be joyful; it is no credit to our Lord when we look as though we were seeking His grave. The dull looks of Christ’s followers have injured Him in the sight of the world. Let us, then, smile as we go, for we have the star if we will look up and put ourselves in the right path.

Thos. Champness

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

October 6th

The bent of regeneration

When it pleased God, … to reveal His son in me. Gal. 1:15, 16.

If Jesus Christ is to regenerate me, what is the problem He is up against? I have a heredity I had no say in; I am not holy, nor likely to be; and if all Jesus Christ can do is to tell me I must be holy, His teaching plants despair. But if Jesus Christ is a Regenerator, One Who can put into me His own heredity of holiness, then I begin to see what He is driving at when He says that I have to be holy. Redemption means that Jesus Christ can put into any man the hereditary disposition that was in Himself, and all the standards He gives are based on that disposition: His teaching is for the life He puts in. The moral transaction on my part is agreement with God’s verdict on sin in the Cross of Jesus Christ.
The New Testament teaching about regeneration is that when a man is struck by a sense of need, God will put the Holy Spirit into his spirit, and his personal spirit will be energized by the Spirit of the Son of God—“until Christ be formed in you.” The moral miracle of Redemption is that God can put into me a new disposition whereby I can live a totally new life. When I reach the frontier of need and know my limitations, Jesus says—‘Blessed are you.’ But I have to get there. God cannot put into me, a responsible moral being, the disposition that was in Jesus Christ unless I am conscious I need it.
Just as the disposition of sin entered into the human race by one man, so the Holy Spirit entered the human race by another Man; and Redemption means that I can be delivered from the heredity of sin and through Jesus Christ can receive an unsullied heredity, viz., the Holy Spirit.

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

October 6: We Want Out
Ezekiel 14:1–15:8; Revelation 5:1–14; Job 33:29–33!

We’ve all had those moments when we just want out, when the chaos of life seems overwhelming. We want an end to the struggle with sin. We want relief from the things that are part of living in a broken world. We know Christ reigns, but we want what is “after these things” (Rev 4:1) right now.
Living in the midst of persecution, the early believers must have experienced these emotions daily. In his revelation, John himself expresses the need for hope in chaos. When he sees a scroll in the hand of “the one who is seated on the throne” (Rev 4:11)—the Father—the apostle weeps because no one has been found worthy to open it. The scroll contains the things that will happen—the judgments that will remove evil and sin and set things right. Without someone worthy enough to open the scrolls, the chaos in the world will continue forever.
But then the Lamb appears. In John’s revelation the 24 elders worship the Lamb for His work of redemption: “And they were singing a new song, saying, ‘You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its seals, because you were slaughtered, and bought people for God by your blood from every tribe and language and people and nation, and made them a kingdom and priests to our God’ ” (Rev 5:9–10).
It is Christ’s work that gives Him the authority to open the seals. As the Lamb who was slaughtered, He reversed death and the fate of those who believe in Him. He is responsible for setting all things right.!
This knowledge is incredibly comforting for us. God is the great chaos-fighter!. Jesus has drawn us out of our own chaos with His sacrifice. He will help us live in the now—in a world that is often chaotic but will, in time, be set right. In the meantime, we can respond to His work of ordering our lives and the lives of those around us. And when we feel helpless and out of control, we can rely on the great chaos-fighter.!

Are you frustrated with your life circumstances? How can you approach difficult areas of your life knowing God will set all things right? How can you rest knowing Christ is at work, right now, in your life?


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, October 6      Go To Evening Reading

         “Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst.” 
         — John 4:14

He who is a believer in Jesus finds enough in his Lord to satisfy him now, and to content him for evermore. The believer is not the man whose days are weary for want of comfort, and whose nights are long from absence of heart-cheering thought, for he finds in religion such a spring of joy, such a fountain of consolation, that he is content and happy. Put him in a dungeon and he will find good company; place him in a barren wilderness, he will eat the bread of heaven; drive him away from friendship, he will meet the “friend that sticketh closer than a brother.” Blast all his gourds, and he will find shadow beneath the Rock of Ages; sap the foundation of his earthly hopes, but his heart will still be fixed, trusting in the Lord. The heart is as insatiable as the grave till Jesus enters it, and then it is a cup full to overflowing. There is such a fulness in Christ that he alone is the believer’s all. The true saint is so completely satisfied with the all-sufficiency of Jesus that he thirsts no more—except it be for deeper draughts of the living fountain. In that sweet manner, believer, shalt thou thirst; it shall not be a thirst of pain, but of loving desire; thou wilt find it a sweet thing to be panting after a fuller enjoyment of Jesus’ love. One in days of yore said, “I have been sinking my bucket down into the well full often, but now my thirst after Jesus has become so insatiable, that I long to put the well itself to my lips, and drink right on.” Is this the feeling of thine heart now, believer? Dost thou feel that all thy desires are satisfied in Jesus, and that thou hast no want now, but to know more of him, and to have closer fellowship with him? Then come continually to the fountain, and take of the water of life freely. Jesus will never think you take too much, but will ever welcome you, saying, “Drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.”

Go To Morning Reading      Evening, October 6

         “He had married an Ethiopian woman.” 
         — Numbers 12:1

Strange choice of Moses, but how much more strange the choice of him who is a prophet like unto Moses, and greater than he! Our Lord, who is fair as the lily, has entered into marriage union with one who confesses herself to be black, because the sun has looked upon her. It is the wonder of angels that the love of Jesus should be set upon poor, lost, guilty men. Each believer must, when filled with a sense of Jesus’ love, be also overwhelmed with astonishment that such love should be lavished on an object so utterly unworthy of it. Knowing as we do our secret guiltiness, unfaithfulness, and black-heartedness, we are dissolved in grateful admiration of the matchless free-ness and sovereignty of grace. Jesus must have found the cause of his love in his own heart, he could not have found it in us, for it is not there. Even since our conversion we have been black, though grace has made us comely. Holy Rutherford said of himself what we must each subscribe to—“His relation to me is, that I am sick, and he is the Physician of whom I stand in need. Alas! how often I play fast and loose with Christ! He bindeth, I loose; he buildeth, I cast down; I quarrel with Christ, and he agree with me twenty times a day!” Most tender and faithful Husband of our souls, pursue thy gracious work of conforming us to thine image, till thou shalt present even us poor Ethiopians unto thyself, without spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing. Moses met with opposition because of his marriage, and both himself and his spouse were the subjects of an evil eye. Can we wonder if this vain world opposes Jesus and his spouse, and especially when great sinners are converted? for this is ever the Pharisee’s ground of objection, “This man receiveth sinners.” Still is the old cause of quarrel revived, “Because he had married an Ethiopian woman.”

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006. Print.