Saturday, November 01, 2014

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary





SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 | HOLY DAY
ALL SAINTS’ DAY
YEARS ABC


  Psalm, First Reading, Second Reading & Gospel, Option I
             Psalm       Psalm 149
             First Reading       Sirach 44:1–10, 13–14
             Second Reading       Revelation 7:2–4, 9–17
             Gospel       Matthew 5:1–12
  or

Psalm, First Reading, Second Reading & Gospel, Option II
             Psalm       Psalm 149
             First Reading       (Sirach 2:1–6) 7–11
             Second Reading       (Ephesians 1:11–14) 15–23
             Gospel       Luke 6:20–26 (27–36)


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Revised Common Lectionary





SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 | SPECIAL DAYS
ALL SAINTS
YEAR A

             First Reading       Revelation 7:9–17
             Psalm       Psalm 34:1–10, 22
             New Testament       1 John 3:1–3
             Gospel       Matthew 5:1–12


Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional





November 1: The Danger of Unwarranted Favor
1 Kings 1:1–53; Mark 1:1–34; Proverbs 1:1–7

No sooner had David assumed the throne of Israel than he began to lose sight of God’s way. As a young “warrior in the wilderness,” he had provided a beacon of hope and an ethical example for God’s people. But King David allowed emotion, rather than spiritual or even rational principles, to drive him. And David’s children made the situation even worse. Although we often look to David as an example to emulate, we can also learn from the mistakes that he made, including the disaster recorded in 1 Kgs 1:5–53.

As king, David was charged with protecting God’s people against all outside enemies. What David didn’t see coming—or so it appears from the text—was the threat from within his own family. When David’s sons began to compete for power, David should have put his love for God’s people and the calling God gave him above his love for his sons. The moment that Adonijah showed signs of laying claim to the throne (1 Kgs 1:5–10), David should have rebuked him—or perhaps even imprisoned or executed him, according to law of the time. Instead, David let it go.

Appointing Solomon as king was a wise political rebuttal, but David still failed to deal with the core problem—Adonijah. David may have been old and sick by this point, but he could have made better provisions for his kingdom, especially with so many loyal military leaders on his side. David’s position as king made his leniency even worse: He should have treated Adonijah like any other traitor.

Why did David ignore Adonijah’s rebellion? Maybe he loved his son. Maybe he was too tired or too frail to take on big problems at the end of his reign. We may never know the reason, but we do know the results. David’s weakness nearly ruined all he had built for God; his mistakes nearly tore the kingdom in two.

Parents often love their children so deeply that they overlook their failings. Righteousness should maintain its proper authority over wishful thinking and ungoverned emotions—in both kingdoms and households.

Who are you unreasonably favoring?

JOHN D. BARRY


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.